Slightly Good News is Better Than Bad News

In an article published on March 16th, 2020, Sharon Begley, a senior writer in science and discovery, discussed the fatality rate of COVID-19.  Early estimates believed the corona mortality rate to be 2-3%.  Recently, the data is showing the rate to be 1.4% or potentially lower.

The purpose of this post is not to minimize the importance of social distancing, healthcare resources, and responsible hygiene.  On the contrary, it is to celebrate something other than terrible news.  Honestly, any good news is actually great news.  With the stock market crashing roughly 30% over the last month, hearing this is overdue for the world.

Some of the numbers from the article (Lower death rate estimates for coronavirus, especially for non-elderly, provide glimmer of hope) are as follows:

The chance of someone with symptomatic Covid-19 dying varied by age, confirming other studies. For those aged 15 to 44, the fatality rate was 0.5%, though it might have been as low as 0.1% or as high as 1.3%… people 45 to 64, the fatality rate was also 0.5%, with a possible low of 0.2% and a possible high of 1.1%. For those over 64, it was 2.7%, with a low and high estimate of 1.5% and 4.7%.

What now?

This reduction in corona mortality rate may mark a great time to evaluate the current approach to managing the pandemic.  In comparison to the second Iraq War following the tragedy of 9/11, the response to COVID-19 has been very similar: a broad and expansive approach.  History has shown that the response may not have been the most efficient.  The intended “quick” response ended up costing several thousands of lives and costing an astronomical amount over multiple decades.  Repeating the same type of emotional decisions will likely have drastic consequences.

Again, the intention of this post is not to declare victory and head to the bar for a beer.  Instead, now is a great time to re-evaluate the current course of action, modify strategies to meet specific timelines, and reset the country in a positive and confident direction.

Then again, I am just a chiropractor and gym owner… what do I know.

Regardless, be kind to your neighbor, good luck, and #keepmoving

Dr.J

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